Recruiting

IT Project & Program Management Recruiters: Where Are They?

Posted on March 17, 2015. Filed under: Executive Job Search, International Job Seekers, IT networking, Job Market Trends, Job Search Tips, Recruiting |

project managementI know what you might be thinking: How hard is it to find recruiters who place for IT project and program management?

The issue isn’t so much that they don’t exist; the issue is how to sift through the vast field of technical recruiting to find the ones who specifically place in the project/program management realm.

Typically, most candidates will not do that. Or they will start out trying to do that and then give up in frustration. (There are only so many hours you can devote to proper LinkedIn searches and so many hours you can devote to calling/e-mailing recruiter after recruiter to see whether he or she is a good fit.)

Furthermore, most candidates still believe that locality is the #1 factor in picking a recruiter. So they just look for ones close to their home and start calling.

The truth is, though, that recruiting is not as local as it used to be.

And all recruiters don’t recruit for all types of positions.

The most common scenario we find is that candidates spend a lot of time calling around or doing online searches, eating away a lot of their job search time, only to find out they weren’t using the right parameters to identify the recruiter in the first place.

Even worse, they end up engaging with a recruiter who might sound good on the surface but doesn’t really place in their field of interest (or at their salary range).

So, yes, there are lots of recruiters out there who place for IT project and program management; the question is how much time do you need to devote to finding them?

OK, so now you might be thinking, “Well, I only need one or two and I’m good.”

That’s true if you luck out and find ones who need you right now. (Maybe that is how it used to go. They came to you, or when you went to them, it was so simple.)

Chances are, though, in today’s job market, you will need to reach out to several recruiters before you find one who fits your parameters and who has a viable position for you. (Watch out…some might engage with you but not really have what you are looking for right now; instead, they might see you as a fit for something else, something you aren’t going for; you can waste a lot of time on this!)

So, here’s the deal: Save yourself hours of frustration and research. Don’t exhaust it on trying to find the recruiters. Instead spend the time engaging with the right ones.

Too much precious job search time is spent on the administrative details when there are options out there to alleviate that.

Plus, they cost much less than several months of LinkedIn Premium subscriptions!

My advice: Get a specialized directory of IT project/program manager contacts and be done with it! Or take it a step further and have a customized list created by a job search specialist just for you!

In an instant, you’ll be ready to get started and you can focus your time on more valuable things, like proper engagement with this recruiters once you do reach out to them.

Doesn’t that sound like a better plan?

 

 

 

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Is Your Technical Recruiter Right for You?

Posted on March 3, 2015. Filed under: Big Data, Career Management, CIO, Consulting/Contracting, cover letter, Cyber Security, Engineering, Executive Job Search, Healthcare IT, International Job Seekers, Interviews, IT networking, Job Market Trends, Job Promotion, Job Search Tips, LinkedIn, Manufacturing, Personal Branding, Product Development, Programming, Project management, Recruiting, Resumes, Retirement, Salary, social media, Software Development, STEM, Technical Infographics, Technical Sales, Technology, Women in IT, Work Issues |

 

technical recruiterOutside of lack of response during your job search, the next most frustrating issue is spending too much time talking to the wrong people.

And this is particularly true when it comes to technical recruiters.

I watch candidates on a regular basis jump through hoop after hoop for recruiters, writing special presentations and bios, changing this and that on their resumes, and showing up at this and that meeting only to find out that the recruiter doesn’t really have openings for their specific background or salary range.

It’s a big waste of everyone’s time. And it can be A LOT of time. But it happens all the time.

So what can you do about it? It starts with proper matching.

Most candidates are under the impression that if a technical recruiter is in their geographical area and is willing to speak with them, then he or she is a good match. But it goes further than that. You need to know if he or she has placed people with your skills/industry background and at your salary range before, and geography is no longer the indicator it used to be as many recruiters place people over a much broader region than they used to.

So it start by doing your research.

Of course, research takes time.

A lot of time. Even with LinkedIn and premium search tools, you still have to have set parameters and know how to research them. It can take hours of precious job search time to find just one or two.

And then you still have to know how to approach them, engage with them, and make sure they really are the good fit they appeared on paper.

It’s why so many candidates give up.

But there is a lot of value in finding the right technical recruiter because when the match is right, the whole process is much easier. Not to mention the fact that recruiting is on the rise and will continue to play a large role in the hiring process in 2015.

So if finding the right technical recruiter is important to you, there are ways to make it easier. You can simply tap into a general directory of technical recruiters already prepared with full contact info. Or you can take it a step further and engage a recruiter matching solution where you can work with a concierge service to have a customized list of recruiters built for you and your needs by a technical job search specialist (not to mention get good guidance on how to approach the recruiters).

It’s not that you can’t do it on your own; it’s that you no longer have to.

(Also, check out our directory of 800+ project/program manager recruiters or directory of CIO recruiters.)

 

 

 

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The Rise of the Corporate Entrepreneur

Posted on February 24, 2015. Filed under: Big Data, Career Management, CIO, Consulting/Contracting, Cyber Security, Engineering, Executive Job Search, Healthcare IT, International Job Seekers, Interviews, IT networking, Job Market Trends, Job Promotion, Job Search Tips, LinkedIn, Manufacturing, Personal Branding, Product Development, Programming, Project management, Recruiting, Resumes, Retirement, Salary, social media, Software Development, STEM, Technical Infographics, Technical Sales, Technology, Women in IT, Work Issues |

In my upcoming book UNCOMMON with Brian Tracy, I wanted to focus on the concept of “corporate entrepreneur.” Thanks to feedback from my social media connections, I was able to gather some great data and comments on what corporate entrepreneurship means to today’s professional.

Below is an excerpt from the book, due out in Summer 2015. If you’d like to download the entire chapter, click on the cover graphic and I will send it to you!

stephen van vreede

Click on cover photo to receive rest of chapter!

 ______________________________

THE RISE OF THE CORPORATE “ENTREPRENEUR”

Let’s face it. The world of “work” is more uncertain than ever. It penalizes you for things you often can’t control … for being too “old,” too experienced, too qualified, too “educated,” too “expensive.” It might not reward you for this certification or that title. On top of that, corporate hiring processes are a sophisticated mess (to put it mildly), internal cultural and multigenerational conflict is commonplace, and many companies are struggling with how to retain their top talent.

As a result, professionals now make an external career move every 3 to 4 years. That means the average 30-year-old with 35 years (or more!) left in the marketplace can expect 10 or more company changes before he or she retires. Even if this professional were to beat the odds with an internal promotion or two, by say double, he or she could still be out in the market every 6 to 8 years.

If all that corporate “goo” isn’t bad enough, then there’s the job market “zoo” to contend with.

BUT THE GOOD NEWS IS THAT IT’S NOT ALL BAD NEWS!

Each day I work with professionals across the globe dedicated to building in career protection, and they are achieving tremendous results. Just like the rest of us, they face many of the same limitations: age, gender, level of experience, geographic restrictions, lack of credentials, market instability, and so on. The difference is in how they approach these limitations and build in their protection from the storm.

IS THERE REALLY SUCH A THING AS CAREER “PROTECTION”?

People tell me that “job security” is a myth today or that if you work for someone else, such as a corporation, you can’t really control your fate.

And I understand what they mean.

IT SEEMS LIKE SOMEONE ELSE IS HOLDING ALL THE CARDS.

 (For the rest of the story, click on the graphic above!)

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