Recruiting

Is Your Technical Recruiter Right for You?

Posted on March 3, 2015. Filed under: Big Data, Career Management, CIO, Consulting/Contracting, cover letter, Cyber Security, Engineering, Executive Job Search, Healthcare IT, International Job Seekers, Interviews, IT networking, Job Market Trends, Job Promotion, Job Search Tips, LinkedIn, Manufacturing, Personal Branding, Product Development, Programming, Project management, Recruiting, Resumes, Retirement, Salary, social media, Software Development, STEM, Technical Infographics, Technical Sales, Technology, Women in IT, Work Issues |

technical recruiterOutside of lack of response during your job search, the next most frustrating issue is spending too much time talking to the wrong people.

And this is particularly true when it comes to technical recruiters.

I watch candidates on a regular basis jump through hoop after hoop for recruiters, writing special presentations and bios, changing this and that on their resumes, and showing up at this and that meeting only to find out that the recruiter doesn’t really have openings for their specific background or salary range.

It’s a big waste of everyone’s time. And it can be A LOT of time. But it happens all the time.

So what can you do about it? It starts with proper matching.

Most candidates are under the impression that if a technical recruiter is in their geographical area and is willing to speak with them, then he or she is a good match. But it goes further than that. You need to know if he or she has placed people with your skills/industry background and at your salary range before, and geography is no longer the indicator it used to be as many recruiters place people over a much broader region than they used to.

So it start by doing your research.

Of course, research takes time.

A lot of time. Even with LinkedIn and premium search tools, you still have to have set parameters and know how to research them. It can take hours of precious job search time to find just one or two.

And then you still have to know how to approach them, engage with them, and make sure they really are the good fit they appeared on paper.

It’s why so many candidates give up.

But there is a lot of value in finding the right technical recruiter because when the match is right, the whole process is much easier. Not to mention the fact that recruiting is on the rise and will continue to play a large role in the hiring process in 2015.

So if finding the right technical recruiter is important to you, there are ways to make it easier. You can simply tap into a general directory of technical recruiters already prepared with full contact info. Or you can take it a step further and engage a recruiter matching solution where you can work with a concierge service to have a customized list of recruiters built for you and your needs by a technical job search specialist (not to mention get good guidance on how to approach the recruiters).

It’s not that you can’t do it on your own; it’s that you no longer have to.

 

 

 

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The Rise of the Corporate Entrepreneur

Posted on February 24, 2015. Filed under: Big Data, Career Management, CIO, Consulting/Contracting, Cyber Security, Engineering, Executive Job Search, Healthcare IT, International Job Seekers, Interviews, IT networking, Job Market Trends, Job Promotion, Job Search Tips, LinkedIn, Manufacturing, Personal Branding, Product Development, Programming, Project management, Recruiting, Resumes, Retirement, Salary, social media, Software Development, STEM, Technical Infographics, Technical Sales, Technology, Women in IT, Work Issues |

In my upcoming book UNCOMMON with Brian Tracy, I wanted to focus on the concept of “corporate entrepreneur.” Thanks to feedback from my social media connections, I was able to gather some great data and comments on what corporate entrepreneurship means to today’s professional.

Below is an excerpt from the book, due out in Summer 2015. If you’d like to download the entire chapter, click on the cover graphic and I will send it to you!

stephen van vreede

Click on cover photo to receive rest of chapter!

 ______________________________

THE RISE OF THE CORPORATE “ENTREPRENEUR”

Let’s face it. The world of “work” is more uncertain than ever. It penalizes you for things you often can’t control … for being too “old,” too experienced, too qualified, too “educated,” too “expensive.” It might not reward you for this certification or that title. On top of that, corporate hiring processes are a sophisticated mess (to put it mildly), internal cultural and multigenerational conflict is commonplace, and many companies are struggling with how to retain their top talent.

As a result, professionals now make an external career move every 3 to 4 years. That means the average 30-year-old with 35 years (or more!) left in the marketplace can expect 10 or more company changes before he or she retires. Even if this professional were to beat the odds with an internal promotion or two, by say double, he or she could still be out in the market every 6 to 8 years.

If all that corporate “goo” isn’t bad enough, then there’s the job market “zoo” to contend with.

BUT THE GOOD NEWS IS THAT IT’S NOT ALL BAD NEWS!

Each day I work with professionals across the globe dedicated to building in career protection, and they are achieving tremendous results. Just like the rest of us, they face many of the same limitations: age, gender, level of experience, geographic restrictions, lack of credentials, market instability, and so on. The difference is in how they approach these limitations and build in their protection from the storm.

IS THERE REALLY SUCH A THING AS CAREER “PROTECTION”?

People tell me that “job security” is a myth today or that if you work for someone else, such as a corporation, you can’t really control your fate.

And I understand what they mean.

IT SEEMS LIKE SOMEONE ELSE IS HOLDING ALL THE CARDS.

 (For the rest of the story, click on the graphic above!)

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The Real Skinny on Prepping for the 2015 Job Market

Posted on January 8, 2015. Filed under: Career Management, Consulting/Contracting, Cyber Security, Engineering, Executive Job Search, Healthcare IT, International Job Seekers, Interviews, IT networking, Job Market Trends, Job Promotion, Job Search Tips, LinkedIn, Manufacturing, Personal Branding, Product Development, Programming, Project management, Recruiting, Software Development, Technical Sales |

2015 job marketGreat news: Bloomberg reports that after November’s remarkable hiring surge, the job market is expected to grow in 2015. If you’ve been stuck in a non-ideal or part-time job and are looking to make a strategic career move, now is the best time to do it. The way we hire and work is changing now more than ever, and there are many exciting opportunities for IT and other technical professionals. But what do you do if you haven’t been on the job hunt in a while and don’t know the new rules of interviewing and hiring?

Don’t worry, we’ve got your back!

  1. Expect a different hiring process

More and more companies are realizing that how they hire reflects well (or poorly) upon their brand. Today’s recruiters and hiring managers are aiming to make the process more human and relatable. Use this friendlier recruitment process to showcase your soft skills, but always keep it professional.

  1. Build a portfolio

Whether or not you have something physical to show for the work you’ve done, hiring managers will want to see examples of your work before you get the interview. Write case studies for projects you’ve worked on to broadcast your skills and back up your claims of success.

  1. Go beyond LinkedIn

If you haven’t spruced up your LinkedIn lately, now’s the time — but don’t stop there! Develop a social media presence that shows off your skills and interest in your profession.

  1. Ask the right questions

A report from LinkedIn says that many qualified job candidates don’t get hired because the interviewers don’t know the best questions to ask them. Learn the “forced-choice question” method — asking what the main objectives for the job are, and then using examples to show how you can achieve them — to help improve your odds.

  1. Anticipate a 3-5 year tenure

Perhaps the biggest change of all, many companies now realize that job seekers will only stay at the company for a handful of years. Know this when going into the interview, and stress what a difference you can make in a short time frame. Be sure to think of this job as the stepping stone to what’s next, not the position you’ll be in for the next several decades.

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