Career Management

6 Tips for Sticking Out Your Holiday Job Search

Posted on December 1, 2015. Filed under: Career Management, Executive Job Search, International Job Seekers, Job Market Trends, Job Search Tips |

holiday job searchIt’s that time of year again. That time when mixed emotions, nostalgia, sentimentality, joy, anxiety, regret, and depression, all float around us for ~6 weeks like some deranged version of the Nutcracker.

And if you’re in career move mode or job search mode, it’s an even more confusing dance.

On top of the typical feelings that come with the end of one year and the beginning of another, job seekers have the emotional baggage that comes with any type of career move (internal or external).

If that isn’t bad enough, everyone, everywhere seems to have an opinion on what it’s like to go through a job search during the holidays that range from complete despair to unfounded optimism.

This year, to help curb some of the mixed signals you might be getting as you wade through the job market zoo during the holidays, I’ve put together a no-nonsense report called “6 Tips for Sticking Out Your Holiday Job Search.”

(I’m probably one of the few who thinks that the holidays can be a positive time for the job seeker if you’re willing to think and act a little differently than most!)

 

Click to download the free report: 6 Tips for Sticking Out Your Holiday Job Search

 

Stephen Van VreedeAbout Stephen—-

Stephen Van Vreede is not your average IT/technical résumé writer. He provides career strategy and concierge job search solutions for senior (15+ years) (ITtechExec) and up-and-coming (NoddlePlace) (5-15 years) tech and technical operations leaders. Stephen and his team focus on building simplified, targeted, and certain career move campaigns, be it an external search or an internal promotion. He is co-author of UNcommon with career development leader Brian Tracy (out June 11, 2015). Contact Stephen directly at Stephen@ittechexec.com or send him an invite at https://www.linkedin.com/in/stephenvanvreede. To see whether Stephen and his team are a good fit for you, take their free (and anonymous) 1-minute compatibility quiz, Is the ITtechExec Approach a Good Match for You? Also, feel free to take his complimentary resume self-assessment quiz, How Certain Can You Be About Your Technical Resume? You might be surprised by what you find out!

Advertisements
Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( None so far )

Your Job in Tech: Is it Time to Stay or Time to Go?

Posted on November 19, 2015. Filed under: Career Management, Work Issues |

stress49Classic career advice says that you should aim to stay at every job for a minimum of one year — but how do you know when it’s time to move on?

There’s been a lot of talk in the past few years about the dramatically changing workplace and how shorter tenures are becoming the norm. Employees just aren’t staying put at their desks for 20 years at a time anymore, especially in the IT and tech arenas. For people navigating the uncertain waters of their careers, this can cause some pretty serious feelings of instability. How short is too short, and how long is too long?

The answer depends on your particular situation.

According to a recent article by Forbes, a good guideline is somewhere between eight months and six years. Here’s how it breaks down:

Eight Months: Only leave if you are truly miserable at the job and think that staying will harm your career.

A Year and a Half: According to the article, this is a good minimum to shoot for because it suggests you passed a review cycle and chose to leave of your own accord.

Four Years: A solid 48-month span of working for the same company looks great on your resume because it’s not too long and it’s not too short. It shows that you’ve had ample time to learn, grow, and get promoted.

Six Years: If you’re staying at a job this long, it should only be because you’ve been promoted to a position of responsibility where you’re working on important projects with senior-level staff.

But, as with every set of guidelines, there are exceptions to the rules. If any of the following apply to you, it could be time to move on — even if you haven’t made it to the 48-month benchmark yet:

You’ve Stopped Learning.

Money is only part of the value our jobs give back to us for our hard work. If you’re learning nothing new, there’s a problem. Your current job is what prepares you for the next one, and if you’re not learning and growing, you won’t be prepared.

You’re Being Underutilized.

Are you sitting on a goldmine of ideas and know-how, but nobody sees it? There’s nothing more frustrating than wasting your potential on jobs that don’t value your skills. Find a job that not only uses your full skill set, but also challenges you to expand it.

Your Career is Stagnating.

If it’s been more than a little while since your last raise or promotion, it might be time to move on. Prepare for your next career move now by either getting that promotion, or moving somewhere else that will raise the bar of your career.

You’re Clinging On.

Sometimes we are the ones who refuse to let go of our jobs. Whatever the reason for clinging, remember that being too comfortable in your current job will most likely make it harder for you to get comfortable in the next one.

Your Ideal Job Is Within Reach

Have you been offered your dream job? Then take it! It’s okay to take a calculated risk with your resume once in a while if the payoff is really worth it. It’s your life, after all, and sometimes the best opportunities don’t come twice — so seize the day, but be smart about it.

 

Stephen Van VreedeAbout Stephen—-

Stephen Van Vreede is not your average IT/technical résumé writer. He provides career strategy and concierge job search solutions for senior (15+ years) (ITtechExec) and up-and-coming (NoddlePlace) (5-15 years) tech and technical operations leaders. Stephen and his team focus on building simplified, targeted, and certain career move campaigns, be it an external search or an internal promotion. He is co-author of UNcommon with career development leader Brian Tracy (out June 11, 2015). Contact Stephen directly at Stephen@ittechexec.com or send him an invite at https://www.linkedin.com/in/stephenvanvreede. To see whether Stephen and his team are a good fit for you, take their free (and anonymous) 1-minute compatibility quiz, Is the ITtechExec Approach a Good Match for You? Also, feel free to take his complimentary resume self-assessment quiz, How Certain Can You Be About Your Technical Resume? You might be surprised by what you find out!

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( None so far )

Work-Life Balance: Why Is It So Elusive?

Posted on October 7, 2015. Filed under: Career Management, Work Issues | Tags: |

work life balanceWork. Life. Balance. These are three of the most problematic words for employers and employees alike. How do you know if you have enough of it? Maybe you have too much of it? Are you working yourself to the bone? Or are people’s careers skyrocketing ahead of you because you focus too much on your personal life?

Experts’ thoughts on work-life balance are changing constantly, and the popular opinion on the subject is truly a moving target. That’s why we surveyed the latest information on the subject to report back to you how those three little words are being interpreted right now, in 2015.

Blurred Boundaries

Rarely are work and life two separate things these days, as Jacob Morgan of Forbes argues. As the expectation for being “always on” increases, so does the expectation that employees will find jobs they actually feel passionate about.

Smartphones Are Controversial

A major part of the blurred work/life boundaries has to do with technology, in particular, smartphones. But being constantly reachable on nights, weekends, and vacations isn’t always well-received by employees. As Fast Company reports, 65% of workers are expected to be reachable outside of work, but a whopping 35% of these employees feel they don’t have enough personal time.

A Little Imbalance Is Okay

As Entrepreneur author Boland Jones writes, “… for entrepreneurs, there’s very little delineation between the two parts of life.” Now that every employee should be thinking like an entrepreneur , we couldn’t agree more. When you’re in charge of your career and always thinking about what’s coming next, you might have work on your mind even when you’re not in the office — and that’s okay!

What’s important is that you connect the hard work you’re putting in with your overall career goals, not that you log long work hours just because everyone else is. When you can see the big picture and you like where you’re headed, it’s worth it.

Stephen Van VreedeAbout Stephen—-

Stephen Van Vreede is not your average IT/technical résumé writer. He provides career strategy and concierge job search solutions for senior (15+ years) (ITtechExec) and up-and-coming (NoddlePlace) (5-15 years) tech and technical operations leaders. Stephen and his team focus on building simplified, targeted, and certain career move campaigns, be it an external search or an internal promotion. He is co-author of UNcommon with career development leader Brian Tracy (out June 11, 2015). Contact Stephen directly at Stephen@ittechexec.com or send him an invite at https://www.linkedin.com/in/stephenvanvreede. To see whether Stephen and his team are a good fit for you, take their free (and anonymous) 1-minute compatibility quiz, Is the ITtechExec Approach a Good Match for You? Also, feel free to take his complimentary resume self-assessment quiz, How Certain Can You Be About Your Technical Resume? You might be surprised by what you find out!

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( None so far )

« Previous Entries
  • Meet Stephen Van Vreede

    Career Coaching Specialist with MBA, CPRW, and ACRW credentials

    Co-founder of ITtechExec & NoddlePlace, offering one-of-a kind resume and job search solutions.

  • Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

  • ITtechExec

  • rezlady

  • RSS NoddlePlace

    • An error has occurred; the feed is probably down. Try again later.

Liked it here?
Why not try sites on the blogroll...

%d bloggers like this: