Interviews

So Exactly How Are Your Video Interviewing Skills?

Posted on June 3, 2015. Filed under: Executive Job Search, International Job Seekers, Interviews, Job Market Trends, Job Search Tips, Personal Branding, Resumes |

hr90If you’re like most professionals today, regardless of where you fall on the corporate ladder, the answer to the title question is, “I don’t really know.”

And why should you really? It’s not like video interviewing has been around a long time or was taught in any college course you likely took.

Yet, the use of video, be it via Skype or FaceTime or Google Hangout or web conferencing is increasingly be used throughout the global marketplace. And it has found its way into the interview process as well.

Slowly but surely, the video interview is starting to replace the phone interview and even some face-to-face interviewing.

This trend will only increase as time goes by and video tools become more sophisticated. Therefore, just like with any interview, preparation is paramount, only you want to make sure you understand some of the differences between video interviewing and face to face.

It might surprise you, but the way you appear on camera and the nuances of body language, surrounding environment, and tone of voice are all more pronounced on video, so you need to understand what someone else is going to see and hear.

Unfortunately, far too many people spend their time obsessing over resumes and LinkedIn profiles only to bomb the interview because they won’t invest in mock interviewing. But truthfully, the mock interview just might be the most valuable of all.

It takes a little swallowing of pride perhaps, but a mock interview with expert feedback can make the difference.

Last year, my team and I realized that too many professionals were out there going it alone. So we decided to do something about it. We launched our concierge job search solutions that now include “crash courses.” One of them is our Video Interviewing crash course. It’s designed for those who want to improve their video interviewing skills, and who want something 1-1 and customized to them. So if that is you, check it out!

Stephen Van VreedeAbout Stephen—-

Stephen Van Vreede is not your average IT/technical résumé writer. He provides career strategy and concierge job search solutions for senior (15+ years) (ITtechExec) and up-and-coming (NoddlePlace) (5-15 years) tech and technical operations leaders. Stephen and his team focus on building simplified, targeted, and certain career move campaigns, be it an external search or an internal promotion. He is co-author of UNcommon with career development leader Brian Tracy (out June 11, 2015). Contact Stephen directly at Stephen@ittechexec.com or send him an invite at https://www.linkedin.com/in/stephenvanvreede. To see whether Stephen and his team are a good fit for you, take their free (and anonymous) 1-minute compatibility quiz, Is the ITtechExec Approach a Good Match for You? Also, feel free to take his complimentary resume self-assessment quiz, How Certain Can You Be About Your Technical Resume? You might be surprised by what you find out!

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Salary Negotiation 411

Posted on April 7, 2015. Filed under: CIO, Consulting/Contracting, Executive Job Search, International Job Seekers, Interviews, Job Promotion, Job Search Tips, Salary |

You might be moving into the salary negotiation phase of your job search soon. This area is a big one as we all want to come out of these negotiations feeling that we set ourselves up for a fair wage (after all, we worked so hard just to get to this point!).

Below are attached some infographics on salary negotiation that you might find useful to you. As always, feel free to share them with friends, colleagues, or across social media:

  • Fool-Proof Salary Negotiation TipsNegotiating higher salaryMy main advice when it comes to salary negotiation is simple:

Know what the market says your worth. Too many people walk into a salary negotiation unaware of this, but it’s the main ingredient. We’d all like to think we can “name our price,” but the market really does that (so capitalistic, I know!). So do your research and build your salary range off of that.

Never offer your lowest number. If your lowest salary expectation is $100K, then your range should be something like $105K-$120K. Chances are you will end up somewhere around $110K, but even if you do end up at $105K, you are still above your bottom number. Of course, there are other factors involved, like benefits and vacation time, and you should weigh them in the offer, but companies know that candidates are willing to make sacrifices in salary for these benefits, so they use it to get you to agree to less money, which means you have to work your way up (here and at the next company) from a lower base.

Desperation never “sells.” Sorry, but like it or not, you are selling something here…your services. We can call it by any other name, if it makes you more comfortable, but what you really need is a good understanding of sales 101: Desperation is a vibe we carry (even if we think we don’t). So work hard to keep a level head. The best way I know is to focus on the benefits, not features, you bring to the employer. What problem are you going to solve for them? Don’t just say you are good and worth it because you have X. Instead, tell them how you will leverage X to make the employer’s life better. Believe it or not, you still have to connect the dots! Ultimately, you want to “win” the offer at a rate you desire, but the company gets a bigger win: an answer to a problem it has because you are going to provide it. (And you want this, by the way. You want the other side of the negotiation to feel like it got a great deal, not because you came cheap but because you offered a great benefit. Your working relationship will start out much better this way.)

 

 

About Stephen—-

Stephen Van Vreede is not your average IT/technical résumé writer. He provides career strategy and concierge job search solutions for senior (15+ years) (ITtechExec) and up-and-coming (NoddlePlace) (5-15 years) tech and technical operations leaders. Stephen and his team focus on building simplified, targeted, and certain career move campaigns, be it an external search or an internal promotion. He is co-author of UNcommon with career development leader Brian Tracy (out June 11, 2015). Contact Stephen directly at Stephen@ittechexec.com or send him an invite at https://www.linkedin.com/in/stephenvanvreede. To see whether Stephen and his team are a good fit for you, take their free (and anonymous) 1-minute compatibility quiz, Is the ITtechExec Approach a Good Match for You? Also, feel free to take his complimentary resume self-assessment quiz, How Certain Can You Be About Your Technical Resume? You might be surprised by what you find out!

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Your Next Career Move Will Be All About That Presentation

Posted on March 31, 2015. Filed under: Career Management, Consulting/Contracting, Executive Job Search, International Job Seekers, Interviews, Job Market Trends, Job Promotion, Job Search Tips, Personal Branding, Resumes |

career moveIn today’s marketplace, you might often be thinking: “Good help is becoming increasingly hard to find. Whom do I trust?”

Just like you, this is exactly what employers are wondering when you approach them in the job search process. And just like you, they want more certainty. It’s why the hiring and promotion process is such a zoo.

They’re convinced they need you; they’re just not persuaded to take the chance. After all, like all of us, they too have made poor choices in the past, choices that have cost hundreds of thousands in salary and benefits.

So what do they do? Nothing…or worse, look for cheaper alternatives.

It’s why presentation in today’s market has taken on so much importance, and it’s why it takes more than experience, certs, and strong connections to close an offer.

Presentation dictates response.

When many think of “presentation,” they think of 4-color artwork, a fancy brochure, a flashy website, or a 5-star multimedia campaign. But the presentation I am referring to is more than that because really what makes a presentation so effective has to do with two things: 1) a strategic, well-positioned story that 2) speaks to how it solves the problems of its target market.

In today’s tech market, employers are saying they can’t find good talent, both in leadership and in tech knowledge, but I meet top candidates everyday who fit this bill. The problem? Presentation.

Candidates won’t invest in getting that right, and hiring leaders are too busy to help them connect the dots. Thus, they both end up confused and frustrated, settling for less than they deserve.

That’s why you need to connect the dots.

Don’t just get another resume; instead, understand how to carry that through to your job search strategy and interview. Make sure you really know what’s going on in the hiring world, specifically your hiring world.

It’s not like it used to be out there. That’s for sure. But the biggest risk is doing all the right things, working hard, producing good results, getting the right credentials, and making good connections, only to bomb the presentation.

So make sure you have everything in place to ace it, to protect everything you’ve worked so hard to build. This way, when companies consider you for a role, they’ll be persuaded you’re more than worth the investment.

 

Stephen Van VreedeAbout Stephen—-

Stephen Van Vreede is not your average IT/technical résumé writer. He provides career strategy and concierge job search solutions for senior (15+ years) (ITtechExec) and up-and-coming (NoddlePlace) (5-15 years) tech and technical operations leaders. Stephen and his team focus on building simplified, targeted, and certain career move campaigns, be it an external search or an internal promotion. He is co-author of UNcommon with career development leader Brian Tracy (out June 11, 2015). Contact Stephen directly at Stephen@ittechexec.com or send him an invite at https://www.linkedin.com/in/stephenvanvreede. To see whether Stephen and his team are a good fit for you, take their free (and anonymous) 1-minute compatibility quiz, Is the ITtechExec Approach a Good Match for You? Also, feel free to take his complimentary resume self-assessment quiz, How Certain Can You Be About Your Technical Resume? You might be surprised by what you find out!

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