Executive Job Market Trends & Analysis (aka “Will I Stay or Will I Go?”)

Posted on March 20, 2012. Filed under: Job Market Trends | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , |

by Stephen Van Vreede (@ITtechExec)

Good News for Some Technical Sectors

ExecuNet recently released some excerpts from their upcoming Job Market Intelligence Report for 2012. With a 14% increase in job placements (assignments) expected throughout 2012, the top 3 growth industries or sectors are projected to be 1) Healthcare, 2) Technology, and 3) Manufacturing. Of course, the number of technology-related positions in the healthcare and manufacturing segments has grown tremendously. So, for IT and technical candidates, this is a good sign for the upcoming year (check out some more 2012 figures).

6 Months for a Job Search Is the Norm

For executive-level candidates, slightly more than half (52%) thought about a job change over the past 12 months. For those candidates that are conducting a job search now or have taken part in a job search over the past year, the expectation was that it would take nearly 6 months to complete the job search but that it would yield a salary or total compensation package increase of about 13%. The 6-month time frame is consistent with the results over the past several years, so there weren’t any apparent “breakthroughs” during 2011, which confirms what most job seekers have believed about the job market in 2011.

So Will You Stay or Will You Go?

Finally, 70% of executives anticipated low or relatively low turnover for the remainder of this year. This statistic cuts two ways. First, the most common view is that people view this figure as a favorable indication that the economy and the job market (and unemployment) have stabilized. So, we shouldn’t expect to see major layoffs or large-scale downsizing initiatives across the board–although some are going to occur regardless of how high or low the market goes. Of course, one can point to the fact that most organizations have gone through their exercise of “right-sizing” to flesh out the dead weight, get lean, cut costs, etc. As a result, there is little need to do more cutting in 2012 unless the economy takes a major turn for the worse.
The second view–which still allows for the opinion above to be true–is that the expectation for little or low turnover is proof of just how tenuous the economy and job market really are. In our experience as resume writers and in the corporate world as hiring directors, when the economy is strong, people are more assertive in the job search. They hire resume writers to help them prepare the best possible document so that they reach for new heights and stretch for the dream job. When things are not looking strong, human nature is to hunker down, be cautious, play it safe, and weather the storm. People are more satisfied trying to hold on to what they have. In other words, for their own security, they decide to stay in their current job, thus reducing employment turnover expectations.

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The ITtechExec Way

To arm yourself with more tools in your technical job search arsenal, we offer a free Technical Jobs report & Online Identity Assessment to our followers. We also offer a 10% discount to our followers. Take advantage of our offer just by signing up to follow this blog or go to our website ITtechExec (be sure to indicate in the “How did you hear about us?” box that you found us through our blog).

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CareerBuilder Review

Posted on February 11, 2011. Filed under: Job Search Tips | Tags: , , , , , |

Job Boardby Sheree Van Vreede (@rezlady)

 

Every so often we like to give a basic breakdown of the many job boards and resource sites out there. This time we are focusing on CareerBuilder.com (with whom we do not have any partnership).

Cost: Free for job seekers

How It Works: You create an account and upload your resume. CareerBuilder.com allows you to conduct a search for postings based on keywords, industry, job categories, location with a mileage range, posting date, education requirements, and salary range. They even allow you to exclude certain companies or job titles from your search. Of course, you can set up alerts so that you are notified when jobs meeting certain parameters get posted on their site.

CareerBuilder also provides access to the “Job Recommendations” tool, which scans your resume for certain terms and creates a list of opportunities that are relevant. There are settings that help you stay confidential, or you can set it up so employers know everything about you. CareerBuilder offers a ResumeUpgrade service in which they basically charge you a fee to move your information up in search rankings relative to other candidates when employers and recruiters conduct a search. There are different levels of the ResumeUpgrade…the more you spend, the better your ranking.

CareerBuilder has recently added an iPhone app and an Android app letting users go mobile with their job search and resume submittal activities.

Assessment: Overall, this is a good site with several caveats.

1. CareerBuilder is huge, so there can be a lot of stuff to weed through to find what you really want. Using proper parameters in your search is important.
2. Competition is strong. Because CareerBuilder is such a popular site, your resume is going to be posted there with thousands of candidates that have similar backgrounds.
3. CareerBuilder works well for candidates below the executive or director level. For executive positions or if you are targeting highly specialized industries, this may not be the best place to start.

Overall, I give CareerBuilder two thumbs up. But don’t let this be your only job search resource.

To check it out for yourself, go to www.CareerBuilder.com.

Did you find this post helpful? If so, please share it! Or send us a comment. We’d love to hear from you.

The ITtechExec Way

To arm yourself with more tools in your technical job search arsenal, we offer a free Technical Jobs report & Online Identity Assessment to our followers. We also offer a 10% discount to our followers. Take advantage of our offer just by signing up to follow this blog or go to our website ITtechExec (be sure to indicate in the “How did you hear about us?” box that you found us through our blog).

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Job Seeker, Is It Time to Change Course?

Posted on April 7, 2009. Filed under: Job Search Tips | Tags: , , , , , , , |

Across the blogosphere, there has been some buzz surrounding the declaration by a well-known Internet marketer that job seekers should just quit the job search and start their own company instead. The reaction among career support professionals was mixed. Some loved the advice. Others hated it. And many others fell somewhere in between.

As for me, I think it is like so many of these things…it got the reaction it was looking for. In other words, it produced the shock value it needed to get everyone talking about it.

So does that mean I disagree? Not exactly. As a small business owner who left the corporate world to try my own venture (which has thankfully done well), of course I think it is a great decision. But as a job search coach who works with hundreds and hundreds of job seekers each year, I can honestly say that not everyone can or wants to be a business owner. And it is pretty unrealistic to think that will happen. (Not to mention the logical implications of it as well…if we all owned businesses, who would do the leg work…most business owners need support, etc.)

For some job seekers, a layoff, firing, and so on is just the push they need to move forward on that great business idea they have always wanted to try. And with some startup capital available and a good understanding of their market, they go for it.

But for those job seekers who see starting their own business as just a way out of a bad time for job searching and are looking for that interim thing, the plan could backfire. For one, leaving the corporate world is a big decision. Although being a business owner is probably one of the hardest jobs out there, particularly if you have to start the business from the ground up, corporate America does not always value the little guy. So if you want to go back to corporate life a couple years down the road, not everyone is going to welcome you back, happy to see that entrepreneur experience on your resume.

Second, to make a business work, you have to really love at the very least some aspect of it or you will fall flat pretty quickly. For me, I love negotiating and dealing with people. My business partner, on the other hand, loves to make it rain. So after she goes in and creates the possibility (often out of thin air), I like to come in and finalize the particulars. It works great now, but it took a long time to figure that out. And it was only drive and determination (and necessity) that made us figure it out. If we had been in it just to keep us going until we went back to corporate life, it never would have worked.

Still other job seekers out there just want and desire to be part of the corporate rat race. They like support roles. Or they like coming in and learning the structure in place, and figuring out how to maneuver in it. That is where the excitement comes into play for them. They want to see the upward mobility and know the potential. They like being a part of something, a group, etc. They don’t want to start it; they want to make it grow or sustain what’s already in place. I’m not sure how these types of people could be expected to be business owners (unless, like me, they had a real rainmaker at their side).

So the point is that you really need to know the kind of worker you are. I mean, even if you are a business owner, truly, you are always working for somebody. If you need to make cash (and we all do), you need someone to give it to you. And that someone (or someones) becomes your boss, so to speak. So the decision really is whether you have the entrepreneurial temperament combined with a strong business concept, perseverance, and startup funds. If you don’t, that’s fine…just don’t bother.

If so, please share it! Or send us a comment. We’d love to hear from you.

The ITtechExec Way

To arm yourself with more tools in your technical job search arsenal, we offer a free Technical Jobs report & Online Identity Assessment to our followers. We also offer a 10% discount to our followers. Take advantage of our offer just by signing up to follow this blog or go to our website ITtechExec (be sure to indicate in the “How did you hear about us?” box that you found us through our blog).

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