Technical Resumes for International Candidates

Posted on March 27, 2012. Filed under: International Job Seekers, Resumes | Tags: , , , , |

international job seekerby Sheree Van Vreede (@rezlady)
For technical candidates with an international or global background, applying for positions in the US is very different from what you have experienced overseas. Most international technical and technology professionals prepare and send a CV (curriculum vitae) to a prospective employer. A CV is a more exhaustive listing of all your work history, marital status, hobbies, interests, etc. US employers don’t care about much of that information. In fact, it would be illegal to ask a candidate about some of these things. Moreover, most US employers are not interested in reviewing a resume that is 5 or 6 pages in length, or even longer!

Keep it Current

Generally, US employers want a candidate to be able to communicate the value he or she would bring as a technical executive in a resume that is 2 or 3 pages in length. All those great programming jobs or the position as an engineering intern you had way back when should not take up as much space on your resume as they did on your CV. In fact, depending on what they were and where they happened, it may not make much sense to include them at all!

In addition, it isn’t necessary to list all the technologies you used to develop a certain software or deploy a new system. That generates too much detail and adds to your page count. It also diverts the attention of the reader and takes their focus from what should be your core message.

So when preparing your executive-level technical resume, consider your audience and the things that they are interested in before you deliver a document that is really designed for a separate group entirely.

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The ITtechExec Way

To arm yourself with more tools in your technical job search arsenal, we offer a free Technical Jobs report & Online Identity Assessment to our followers. We also offer a 10% discount to our followers. Take advantage of our offer just by signing up to follow this blog or go to our website ITtechExec (be sure to indicate in the “How did you hear about us?” box that you found us through our blog).

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Applicant Tracking Systems and Your Resume

Posted on March 27, 2012. Filed under: Job Market Trends, Resumes | Tags: , , , , |

ATSby Sheree Van Vreede (@rezlady)

Applicant Tracking Systems Are Here to Stay

Applicant Tracking Systems (ATS) are a reality in today’s world of the job search and resume posting. Regardless of your opinion of them or mine — which is that the way companies set them up makes them ineffective and costs them lots of dollars — they are here to stay and are increasing in number. A January 2012 Wall Street Journal article provides some good background and statistics on the topic. You can view it here.

The real question is: What do I do with my resume so that it works well with these resume screening ATS systems? Although most claim that a Word document will work fine, that’s not really true. Resumes done in MS Word inherently have a good amount of formatting behind the scenes to make the resume look nice. That’s great when you email it or print it out for someone to view. Its not so nice for the ATS. The technology is such that they have difficulty parsing the data in your resume properly. Which means that information doesn’t always get placed in the right bucket. Oftentimes, this leads to the resume being “booted out” of the system.

Two Is Good; Three Is Better

The answer is to have multiple versions of your resume to handle the various submittal requirements. When submitting through an ATS, a text-only (ASCII) or e-version of the resume is the best way to go. The text-only version strips out all the fancy formatting and reorganizes the information into the proper order so that the ATS can load it successfully.

Did you find this post helpful? If so, please share it! Or send us a comment. We’d love to hear from you.

The ITtechExec Way

To arm yourself with more tools in your technical job search arsenal, we offer a free Technical Jobs report & Online Identity Assessment to our followers. We also offer a 10% discount to our followers. Take advantage of our offer just by signing up to follow this blog or go to our website ITtechExec (be sure to indicate in the “How did you hear about us?” box that you found us through our blog).

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Technical Resumes: The Real Skinny by @ITtechExec

Posted on March 21, 2012. Filed under: Resumes | Tags: , , , , |

by Stephen Van Vreede (@ITtechExec)

So, here it is:

Most resume writers don’t want to write technical resumes.

So they either 1) avoid the IT/technical candidate like the plague or 2) they forge ahead with your resume thinking you are just like every other type of candidate, except in a different field.

Recently, I attended a conference packed with resume writers, where I was to help facilitate a small group forum regarding technical resume writing. The silence was deafening. I could hear crickets chirping from miles away. No one wanted to talk about it because no one wants to write those types of resumes.

It’s an odd perspective if you think about it because the STEM fields right now are the ones most looking to hire! Just check out the latest 2012 figures.

Why don’t these resume writers want to write them?

Resume writing is basically built on a volume-based premise. The more you write, the more you make. Certain fields require more finesse than others, to put it bluntly, and that finesse takes time to learn and craft. And speaking Geek is, frankly, not in everyone’s vocabulary.

What makes a technical resume so different?

Many people think that the problem with CIO resumes or IT project manager resumes is the jargon, but in my mind, the real challenge is in positioning the candidate for the role/environment he or she is targeting. Titles like “project manager” and “CIO” are not universal across companies and balancing technical knowledge against operations management experience requires some strategy. Is the company looking more for a strict manager who can oversee technical operations, a technical guru who can also manager, or some other combination?

So what should the technical job seeker look for in a resume writer?

Technical candidates need to be asking potential writers about their background writing in their field, what approach they take to technical resumes, and what rate of return they are seeing for their clients. Obviously, my company, ITtechExec, focuses on resume writing for STEM candidates, so of course, I have some agenda in plugging what we do. But there are other technical writers out there who have made it their passion to work with candidates like you, and it is worth making the investment.

Did you find this post helpful? If so, please share it! Or send us a comment. We’d love to hear from you.

The ITtechExec Way

To arm yourself with more tools in your technical job search arsenal, we offer a free Technical Jobs report & Online Identity Assessment to our followers. We also offer a 10% discount to our followers. Take advantage of our offer just by signing up to follow this blog or go to our website ITtechExec (be sure to indicate in the “How did you hear about us?” box that you found us through our blog).

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